College News from Around the World

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KIMBERLEE PARTON
Staff Writer

UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT COLLEGE OF MEDICINE
Burlington, VT, USA

Hematologist Dr. Mary Cushman and fellow researchers at the University of Vermont College of Medicine have conducted a study examining the link between blood type and cognitive impairment. Dr. Cushman and her team analyzed data from more than 30,000 adults, and after adjusting the study for age, race, geographical region and sex, found that those with the rare blood type AB were 82% more likely to develop problems with memory, language and attention with age compared to other blood types.

VICTORIA UNIVERSITY OF WELLINGTON
Wellington, New Zealand

For his Master’s thesis, Industrial Design student Zach Challies has developed a prosthetic nose using 3D printing. Under the supervision of professors Ross Stevens and Bernard Guy, Challies has been working to design the facial prosthesis in hopes of allowing its wearer to continue to lead an active lifestyle — something most facial prosthesis wearers are unable to do for fear of having their prosthetic feature detach and fall off. An even better catch? Challies is able to print his design for under $50, making it affordable for potential clients.

McGILL UNIVERSITY
Montreal, QC, Canada

Over the years, scientific and medical researchers have questioned whether rats and mice are legitimate test subjects to use in laboratory studies due to difficulties in replicating test results.  Professors at McGill University led a team of international pain researchers to find out why this discrepancy occurs. Results of the study show that the high concentrations of pheromones released by male researchers produce a stress response in mice and rats — all mammals share the same chemosignals — making the test subjects less sensitive to pain. Female researchers produced no such effect on the rodents.

UNIVERSITY OF NOTTINGHAM
Nottingham, England, UK

A new chemistry laboratory due to open next year at the University of Nottingham was completely destroyed by a fire in the middle of the night on Sept. 13 — a “major setback” for the university, who spent over $24 million to have the building constructed. University registrar, Paul Greatrix, said it was to be the “world’s first carbon-neutral lab,” and vowed to have the lab rebuilt. Over 60 firefighters worked through the night to take control of the blaze, and no injuries or deaths have been reported.

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